Iowa Banking Law Blog

Senate fails to delay implementation of interchange fee caps
Jun. 8, 2011L. Allyn Dixon Jr., Iowa Banking Law Blog
Senate fails to delay implementation of interchange fee caps

In a closely watched vote, legislation in the Senate that would have delayed the Federal Reserve’s implementation of the interchange (card swipe) fee caps of 12 cents per transaction beginning July 21 failed to muster the required 60 vote to force a delay.  The final vote was 54-45 in favor of the legislation, just six votes shy of the number needed.

Current estimates show that the average swipe fee is 44 cents per transaction, and estimates of the cost to banks of the new caps are between $10 and $15 billion.  Banks large and small worked hard to see the interchange fee provisions of Dodd-Frank changed.  Although banks with less than $10 billion in assets are exempt from the caps, from a competitive standpoint, most small banks believe they will have to reduce fees to be in a position to compete with bigger banks for customers.

The Fed indicated it is set to introduce the new rules in a matter of days and has given no indication yet that it is inclined to set the fee cap higher than the earlier-proposed 12 cents per transaction.

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Categories: Allyn Dixon, Banking Law
Industry Categories: Banks & Financial Institutions
Practice Area Categories: Banking Law, Regulatory Compliance

L. Allyn Dixon Jr.

Email:

adixon@dickinsonlaw.com

Phone:

515.246.4520
 

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